Robinson Crusoe is a Good Negative Role Model

Robinson Crusoe is a British guy who gets stranded on an island after selling the Black guy who helps him escape from pirates. It is considered a contender for the first British novel.

Philosophy >> Morals >> Negative Role Models

Who has impacted you more: The person you think of when you think of whom you don’t want to be, or your hero?

It’s not an easy call. I couldn’t tell you my own answer.

Heroes are important. No doubt. Goes without saying, really, but rarely is the importance of the villain vocalized. It’s true that we would never get anywhere without Simba, but sometimes it is all we can do to Not Be A Scar. That is normal. It does not make you a bad person. 

Negative Role Models

Adding fuel to this argument is the element of Lowest Common Denominators (LCDS) — the LCDs of a society. The LCDs of understanding a hero will have serious obstacles to overcome in order to be like the hero. The path of least resistance for these folks, and many people, really, is to simply avoid rather than seek. And although it is an incomplete path, there is nothing wrong with where it leads.

For more clarification on what it means to be an LCD, check out the attached link.

Some people, including a lot of kids and teens, might not understand all the deep virtues in a complex story, but they WILL understand that being the bad guy gets them nowhere.

The Point

So why would a proud South American recommend that you read an annoying book about how the British colonizer successfully converted South American cannibal savages into proper Christian citizens?

Well, it is because there are people whom I accept are a part of me who I very strongly do not want to be like. However, my solution is not to detach myself from the negative role model entirely. Frankly, it would be really nice to raise the LCDs and the negative role models.

Of course that leads to a whole other discussion about Absolute Progress.